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Monthly News Report On Grains

FAO Trade and Markets Division

MNR ISSUE 146 - September 2018

 

Market News

    Low maize prices see decrease in sorghum use, support animal production in Mexico

    Pace of Russia wheat harvest slows on delays in Siberia, Urals regions

    Indonesia’s 2018 food wheat imports to rise 6 percent despite cost hike

    World oats production holds steady

    ustralian grains price rally ‘could last well into 2019’

    China’s   ugust grain imports slide on Sino-US trade war

    WTO members clamour for more

    Green Plains turns off ethanol plants, cuts output

    Turkey puts temporary limit on flour exports

    rgentina’s export tax drive maize acres lower

 

Reports

    Agriculture in the WTO: Rules and limits on US domestic support - CRS Report

    The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets  - FAO

    The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the world - FAO

    Crops Prospects and Food Situation - FAO 

 

Monthly Information Sources

 

    AMIS Market Monitor

    FAO Cereal Supply and Demand Brief - FAO

    Grain Market Report - IGC

    Oilcrops Monthly Price and Policy Update - FAO

    Crop Monitoring in Europe - European Commission

    FAO Rice Price Update - FAO

    World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates - USDA

    Early Warning Crop Monitor - GEOGLAM

    Commodity Price Data - World Bank

    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) - FAO

    GIEWS Country Briefs - FAO

 

Market News

Low maize prices see decrease in sorghum use, support animal production in Mexico

26 September - Feednavigator.com

 

Feed maize prices are supporting an increase in animal production and a move away from the use of sorghum in feed rations for producers in Mexico.  The US Department of Agriculture released details for both feed grain and animal production in Mexico in a series of reports last week.

 

Production expectations and imports have been lowered for sorghum, while the agency forecasts an increase in wheat planting acreage, the attaches said.  “For MY 218/19, the total feed grains consumption estimate has been revised downward from the USDA/official estimates to 4.85 million tonnes, based on information from official and private sources,” they said͘ “Private sources noted that feed consumption is expected to shift away from sorghum to feed maize, due to lower-than previously-estimated domestic sorghum production and consequently higher domestic prices”͘  “In addition, private sources stated that expected lower maize prices would continue  stimulating Mexico’s import demand for yellow maize from the animal feed sector and that  the United States should continue to be the main supplier to cover that demand,” they  added.

 

There were some dry conditions during the summer, but that is not expected to impact production.  “While the Mexican livestock industry employs both pasture and feedlots, industry relies   heavily on imported grains for feed such as yellow maize, oilseed meals, sorghum and other meals and I nputs such as distiller’s dried grains͘  According to industry almost 100 percent of the feed used in swine production originates from imported US grains, which are currently at low prices”͘  Production estimates for sorghum for the 2018/19 market year were reduced based on a  decrease in planted area stemming from poor farm gate prices, the attachés said. The  spring/summer production also saw challenges from weather conditions.  Import expectations for the feed grain in 2018/19 were lowered based on the continuing   difference in price between maize and sorghum: “given that the difference between maize  and sorghum prices continues to be relatively high, Mexico’s animal feed industry tends is  expected to continue to strongly prefer yellow maize over sorghum͘”  Currently there is not any tender for imported sorghum from the main animal feed and  livestock Mexican importers for the upcoming months. Animal feed industry sources noted  sorghum, maize, and even wheat continue to compete with each other to meet Mexican feed  demand, and ultimately the mix of these commodities will depend on the market price.

 

The sector tends to prefer yellow maize over sorghum even at the same price, due to higher convertibility and other factors.   Maize production for 2017/18 was increased based on improved yields and harvest area. Estimated production for the MY 2018/19 has remained unchanged, official sources noted that planted area could decrease for the next 2018/19 fall/winter crop season, due to the relatively low level of water in key reservoirs. It is too early to make more definitive predictions as water reservoirs could be replenished during the hurricane season, the attachés said. Production for the 2018 spring/summer maize crop is anticipated to be strong.  Maize exports are anticipated to be down, and ending stocks for marketing year 2017/18 were increased, they said.  Wheat production for 2018/19 was increased by about 4 percent based on planted area, they added. 

 

Pace of Russia wheat harvest slows on delays in Siberia, Urals regions

25 September

 

The pace of the wheat harvest in Russia is lower year on year as of September 20 after  harvesting in the eastern regions of Siberia and the Urals got off to a late start due to delayed sowing and poor weather, the agriculture ministry said.  This is in contrast to a month ago when an earlier-than-usual start to harvesting in the south  of Russia because of favorable weather meant the pace of harvesting was quicker year on  year.  But that situation reversed as the harvest moved into eastern Russia, and Siberia and the  Urals in particular, mainly producing spring crops. Late sowing and low temperatures during the development stage and rains in September resulted in delays to the harvest.  As of September 20 the country had harvested 35 million ha, or 78% of the seeded area,  from 37.7 million ha harvested a year ago. Total grains production amounted to 93 million mt at an average yield of 2.65 mt/ha, down 0.44 mt/ha from a year ago.  However, in Siberia only 35.9% of the seeded area has been harvested, or 3.2 million ha,  from 6.5 million ha a year ago. Total grains production amounted to 6.3 million mt, 44% less than a year ago, though yields are 13% higher at 1.96 mt/ha.

In its latest WASDE report, the USDA has estimated Russian wheat production this year at 71 million mt, down from 85 million mt last year.  Some sources, however, have said that this number does not take into account the situation in eastern Russia, in which case grain production, and wheat in particular, may be lower than most recent estimates suggest.  In addition, the agriculture ministry last week wrote off 700,000 ha under wheat due to crop damage, which also may not have been considered in the estimates.

 

There have also been estimates of lower wheat output in some other key countries. Statistic Canada estimates national wheat production this year at 29 million mt, down 3% from last year. In Australia, wheat production is forecast at 19.1 million mt, down from 21.2 million mt  last year, according to the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and  Sciences (ABARE). Lastly, EU soft wheat production is forecast at 129.8 million mt this year,  down 9% year on year, according to European Commission estimates.  Such forecasts appear to provide some support to wheat prices. S&P Global Platts assessed  Russian 12.5% protein wheat at $221.25/mt Friday, up $2.50/mt week on week.

 

Indonesia’s 2018 food wheat imports to rise 6 percent despite cost hike

25 September - The Business Times

 

Indonesia's imports of wheat for flour are expected to reach 8.5 million tonnes this year, an industry body said, up from 8 million tonnes in 2017, despite increasing prices of the grain.  Indonesian demand for noodles, biscuits and snacks like martabak, a local version of a  pancake, has climbed steadily in recent years as a growing middle class adopts a more  western diet.

 

The country is the world's second-biggest wheat importer, behind Egypt, according to United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) data.  But a 9 per cent drop in the value of the rupiah against the US dollar this year has increased costs for importers and may slow consumption going forward, Indonesian Flour Mills  Association chairman Franky Welirang said.  "Purchasing power could decline," said Welirang, referring to the weakening rupiah and a  forecast 10 per cent climb in wheat flour prices in the second half of 2018.  Wheat prices have also been pushed up after poor harvests in Australia, the world's fourth  biggest wheat exporter and a key supplier to Indonesia, and a fall in Russian wheat output  tightened global supply.  "We've looked for wheat in other places - Russia, Ukraine," Welirang said. "Wheat is expensive."  Over the past 10 years, Indonesia's wheat imports have grown 5 per cent a year on average,  and wheat imports in the first half of 2018 reflected a continuation of this trend, Welirang  said. Indonesia bought a total of 10.5 million tonnes of wheat in 2017/18, compared with Egypt's  12.4 million tonnes, the USDA data shows.

 

World oats production holds steady

24 September - Graincentral.com

 

Global oats production has remained relatively static from 2011/17, reaching 23 million  tonnes (Mt) in 2017 after fluctuating mildly, according to the “World: Oats - Market Report. nalysis and Forecast to 2025” published by IndexBox͘  Production fell abruptly over 2009/10 due to a slump in demand during the global financial  crisis.   Afterwards, the global output recovered and then flattened through to 2017, but yet failed to regain its pre-crisis peak levels.  Global harvested area of oats also kept a relatively flat trend pattern from 2011-2017, declining slightly over the last two years to 9.260 million hectares.  Russia (4.7Mt), Canada (2.9Mt), Australia (1.4Mt) remain key oat producing countries in 2017, with a combined 39 per cent share of the total output.  The other major producers, namely Poland, Finland, Brazil, the United States, Spain,

Argentina, the United Kingdom, Sweden and Chile, lagged far behind in terms of oats output. In Canada, production levels had been decreasing by -4.6pc annually from 2007 to 2017, due to a decrease in harvested areas over the last two years. In Russia and Australia, oats output experienced a very mild decrease.  Oats are a widely traded commodity, with the share of exports in total global output standing at about 16pc in 2017.

 

The trade intensity is not very high due to most oats being consumed locally (especially in Russia); however, there are significant amounts of imported oats in the US (the second  consumer worldwide), Germany, China and some other countries. The export volume totaled  3.2Mt in 2017 which is 4pc more than in the previous year. The volume of oat exports  maintained a relatively flat trend pattern over the last 10 years, with noticeable fluctuations in certain years.

 

In 2017 the value of exports totalled $725M, bouncing back slightly against the previous year. Unlike the export volume, the export value was fluctuating during the observed period due to price fluctuations.

There was a sharp drop from 2015-2016 due to a decrease in oats price. The price reflected a  general trend for global cereal grain market, where prices were being pressured by a drop of  energy prices.

As of 2017, Canada had the largest export volume of 1.5Mts, comprising 48pc of total global  import. It was followed by, all lagging far behind, Australia (13pc), Finland (10pc) and Sweden (8pc).

 

The volume of global imports totalled 3.6Mt in 2017, which is 9.9pc more than in the previous year.  The volume of oats imports maintained a pattern which echoed that of the volume of exports: these trade flows complement each other at a global scale.  As of 2017, the US had the largest import volume of 1.5Mt which accounted for 43pc of total global imports.  It was followed by China, which occupied another 25pc share, and Mexico, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Japan.

 

Oat imports into the US decreased at an average annual rate of -1.9pc from 2007 to 2017.  At the same time, China emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR  (compound annual growth rate) of +32.3pc from 2007-2017, boosted by rising demand for  cereal foods and breakfasts amid rapid urbanization and popularity of heathy diets. 

 

Australian grains price rally ‘could last well into 2019’

24 September - Agrimoney.com

 

The rally in Australian grain prices, which has driven wheat futures to record highs, could last  “well into 2019” if dryness in the east of the country does not let up, National   ustralia Bank  said.  The bank cut again its forecast for the wheat harvest in the southern hemisphere’s top  exporter of the grain, this time by 300,000 tonnes to 18.1m tonnes, down 3.1m tonnes year on year, citing in the main “severe drought” in eastern areas, besides some frosts which have also caused some damage.  The estimate compares with a figure of 19.1m tonnes from Abares, the official Australian  commodities bureau, and a 20.0m-tonnes forecast by the US Department of Agriculture.

 

“Conditions in New South Wales and Queensland are very poor and we don’t expect much in way of a winter crop from these areas,” the bank said, cutting its forecast for the New South Wales harvest to 2.3m tonnes, although noting improvement too to hopes for Western  Australia, the top grain-growing state.  The Western   Australia forecast was lifted to 9͘5m tonnes, albeit a figure “lower than we probably would have placed it two weeks ago”, before a cold snap.  “Late frosts have caused considerable drama in the west and east, and a lot of crop is now being cut for hay͘”

The poor production outlook has sent grain prices soaring, as domestic users, notably the livestock industry, have fought to keep supplies off the export market, raising ASX wheat futures last week to a record high of Aus$445.00 a tonne on a spot contract basis.  ustralian, especially east coast, prices are at very high levels,” N  B said͘

 

“With the New South Wales crop in a parlous state, more Western Australia grain is likely to make its way east via coastal shipping͘”  Prices of other grains too have been elevated by domestic demand from livestock feeders, who have seen pasture condition deteriorate.  If it stays dry, “substantial domestic grain premiums are likely to remain”, the bank said,  seeing the potential for prices to remain elevated for some months yet if dryness scuppers prospects for sorghum, which offers the next opportunity to boost supplies, after the forthcoming winter grains harvest. The bank termed as an “emerging issue” whether New South Wales and Queensland,  responsible for the vast majority of   ustralian sorghum output, “can expect much sorghum, unless conditions improve.  “Yields could be poor unless the season markedly improves by the end of the year,” N  B said, noting that early sowings had already begun in Queensland.

 

“If sorghum yields disappoint, domestic grain prices could stay high well into 2019͘”  The comments come as Australia is early this week expecting further dryness, as the coming of spring sees a warming in temperatures.  “Heat is now taking its toll on the crops that have made it this far,” said New South Walesbased grain merchant AgVantage.  gronomists around the area have shared that some plants have come to head and are  showing a vast difference in growth development within small areas of the same paddock͘”  AgVantage reported sorghum prices at Aus$390 per tonne in the Darling Downs market in  southern Queensland for March-April delivery, up from Aus$305 per tonne a year ago.  N B added that  ustralian sorghum prices could also “be a beneficiary of the US-China trade  tensions”, given that China is a large importer of the grain, which it has historically typically  sourced from the US.  However, Australia’s prices “are now so high that export markets could be priced out”͘  China last month imported 60,000 tonnes of sorghum, down from 220,000 tonnes in July, and 259,892 tonnes in August last year according to figures published by the General Administration of Customs at the weekend.  In 2017, China imported 5.06m tonnes of sorghum, of which 4.76m tonnes were purchased from the US, and 296,000 tonnes from Australia. 

 

China’s   August grain imports slide on Sino-US trade war

24 September - Nasdaq.com

 

China's grain imports fell sharply in August, customs data showed on Sunday, a month after Beijing imposed hefty tariffs on shipments from the United States, one of its top suppliers. China brought in 60,000 tonnes of sorghum in August, down 78.5 percent from 259,892 tonnes a year ago, according to figures published by the General Administration of Customs. Shipments were also down from July's 220,000 tonnes.  The duties cover sorghum, maize and soybeans, key raw materials for China's huge animal feed industry, as well as pork, which had already been hit with tariffs in April.  The customs figures do not give a country by country breakdown, but China imports almost all of its sorghum from the United States.  The import slump came despite a fall in sorghum prices that made shipments attractive even when adding in the cost of the tariff, said market participants.  "I dare not buy large volumes as there is still policy risk," said a Chinese sorghum trader,   referring to the potential for Beijing to take additional measures to deter U.S. imports.  He declined to be identified as he is not allowed to talk with media.  China also bought 330,000 tonnes of maize in August, down 13.5 percent from 377,518

tonnes a year ago. Wheat imports fell 51.6 percent from a year earlier to 140,000 tonnes.  China imports about a third of its maize and wheat from the United States, according to  customs data.

China imported 550,000 tonnes of barley in August, down 29.1 percent from 781,669 tonnes a year earlier, according to the data.  August pork imports rose 10.8 percent year on year to 92,587 tonnes, despite tariffs on  product from the United States, a major supplier to China, and low domestic pig prices that have reduced demand for cheap imports.  Sugar imports in August fell 24.4 percent to 150,000 tonnes, the data showed.

 

WTO members clamour for more clarity on US farm spending

20 September - Blackseagrain.com

 

Trading partners will demand more details from the United States at the World Trade  Organization next week about its planned $12 billion aid package for U.S. farmers hurt by the Trump administration’s tariff wars͘  The U.S. aid package, announced in July, is intended to shield U.S. farmers from the  repercussions of trade disputes between the United States and China, the European Union and others.

But other WTO members want more clarity on how long it will last and whether it adheres to WTO rules as it could have an impact on their own agriculture sectors and competition.

 

A compilation of written questions submitted to the WTO's regular agriculture committee meeting on Sept. 25-26 included questions from New Zealand, Japan, India, the European Union, Canada and Australia, all demanding more detail on the plan.  Australia asked when the plan would be formally notified to the WTO, how long it would go on, and how its various programs -- market facilitation, food purchase and distribution, and agricultural trade -- would fit into the WTO rules.  New Zealand said it was concerned the package would take the United States close to its total allowable farm subsidy of $19.1 billion, and sought an assurance it was a one-time payment that would not carry on in future.

 

A first $6 billion has already been made available, so Australia wanted to know what would trigger the roll-out of the second half of the package, and whether those funds would be available under the same programs as the first tranche.  It also asked how the U.S. Department of Agriculture came up with the formula for payouts under the $4.7 billion market facilitation program, which aimed to reflect the severity of trade disruption, with 50 percent of the producer's total 2018 actual production multiplied by

the applicable rate.  Japan and Canada were concerned the market facilitation payouts could amount to excessive support for production.  The market facilitation program will make direct payments to producers of cotton, maize,  fluid milk, pork, soybeans, sorghum and wheat, and Canada wanted to know if more products might be covered in future.  The $200 million trade promotion program was intended to mitigate "adverse effects of other countries' restrictions", but Australia wanted to know precisely what that meant.  "Could the United States confirm that this $200 million fund will not be used to subsidize the export of U.S. products to international markets?" Canada asked.

 

Green Plains turns off ethanol plants, cuts output

17 September - Reuters

 

Major U.S. ethanol producer Green Plains Inc (GPRE.O) is shutting down or cutting output at plants across the Midwest due to low profit margins, five industry sources told Reuters on  Monday.  The slash in production comes after the Trump administration’s escalating trade disputes cut off U.S. access to ethanol markets in China, contributing to a domestic supply glut that has pushed biofuel prices near their lowest levels in over a decade. 

 

Green Plains idled until further notice its facility in Superior, Iowa, and soon will shut down

the plant in Lakota, Iowa, while the company’s plant in Fairmont, Minnesota, was running at

half of its capacity, according to three of the sources, who asked not to be named. Two additional sources, both ethanol traders, said even more plants had been shut down or  cut production.  “They’re taking down some of their best-performing assets,” said one trader, mentioning plants in Fergus Falls, Minnesota and Bluffton, Indiana.

 

Company spokesman Jim Stark confirmed the Superior plant was temporarily shut down.  “Lakota is running and so is Fairmont͘ We don’t comment on run rates at any particular  plant,” Stark said in an email͘ He declined to comment on Fergus Falls or Bluffton.  Green Plains said in an Aug. 30 regulatory filing it was reassessing production levels based on current market conditions.

 

Green Plains has annual ethanol production capacity of roughly 1.48 billion gallons, making it about tied with Valero Energy Corp (VLO.N) as the No. 3 ethanol maker in the United States, behind POET LLC and Archer Daniels Midland Co (ADM.N).  The company said in a May filing it was considering selling some of its assets. Another source familiar with the company said on Monday it was now actively seeking to sell them. Asked for comments about potential sales, Green Plains spokesman Stark said only that its “portfolio optimization plan” would be completed this year͘  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under former administrator Scott Pruitt issued  waivers to some oil refiners exempting them from requirements to blend ethanol into the  U.S. gasoline supply. The waivers, coupled with trade tensions between the United States and China, have pressured prices for ethanol.  Green Plains has invested in cattle feedlots and vinegar production in efforts to diversify from  biofuel.

 

Last week, privately held Ergon Inc said it would permanently close its only ethanol plant, in Mississippi.

Ethanol output typically declines in September and October as operators perform  maintenance to prepare equipment ahead of the new maize harvest. Some plants were likely to extend downtimes this year because of poor profitability.  The U.S. Energy Information Administration last week said average ethanol output dropped 67,000 barrels per day to 1.02 million bpd, the lowest since April.

 

Turkey puts temporary limit on flour exports

7 September - World-grain.com

 

The Turkish government said on Sept. 6 that due to recent fluctuations in domestic flour  prices it has introduced a regulation limiting exports of flour produced from grain grown  domestically, outside of the Inward Processing Regime duty exemption mechanism, to 1% of total exports, according to S&P Global Platts.  The Ministry of Trade told S&P Global Platts the action was taken to stabilize domestic flour prices, protect consumers and prevent speculation, but noted that the export limit was temporary and would be removed when domestic price stability returned.  Turkey has been the world’s top flour exporter over the last five years, accounting for one- third of all flour exports. In 2017, Turkey exported 3.6 million tonnes of flour worth $1.1  billion.  Facing a severe economic crisis in which the lira has plummeted against the dollar, Turkey’s flour exporters have been facing prohibitive wheat import costs in recent months. As a result, the number of Russian ships bringing wheat into Turkey has fallen from 10 a day to fewer than 10 a week, according to S&P Global Platts.  The situation prompted Turkey’s state grains agency, TMO, to open its 2 million tonnes of grains stocks in early August, several months earlier than usual.

 

Argentina’s export tax to drive maize acres lower

6 September - Agriculture.com

 

Argentina has suffered a currency crisis since the beginning of the year, and the Argentinian peso devalued over 100% against the U.S. dollar since then.  This is sparking increased export taxes for rgentina’s agricultural commodities.  s a consequence of higher interest rates in the U͘S͘ and the European Union, the country’s  debt skyrocketed to record levels. As of January of 2018, nearly 18 pesos purchased one  dollar͘ t the end of today’s session, to buy one U͘S͘ dollar, you will need around 39 pesos.  In order to reach a full agreement with the International Monetary Fund, the government of Argentina decided to accelerate its fiscal adjustment and target zero deficit for the 2019  budget. President Mauricio Macri announced US$ 12.9 billion in cuts and the return of  export taxes.  On farm exports, the tax rate would be four pesos for every dollar in exports with a roof of  10%. The exception is soybeans, which kept the export taxes already in place. The taxes on  the oilseed will have the rate cut anticipated and that will be 18%, plus the four pesos for  each dollar. That means if the Argentinian currency continues to devalue, the export tax will   disappear automatically.  Biodiesel, soybean oil, soybean meal, or any other processed product will have a rate of 3 pesos for each dollar exported, as a push for industrial exports.  In addition, U.S. president Donald Trump yesterday announced that the U.S. treasury could  loan an extra fund of $10 billion to finance Argentina and avoid any possibility of default

because the South merican country is considered a “valuable friend͘”  In the view of Gustavo López, president of Agritrend, based in Buenos Aires, the new tax will  reduce the maize surface in rgentina͘ “Wheat was already planted͘ Maize is yet to be  planted in Argentina after the wheat harvest. And maize was punished again.  “When planting starts, a portion previously thought to be maize will be soybeans. And sales  from the old crop perhaps could take longer than expected,” analyzed López͘

 

A report from the market consultancy AZ Group indicates that crop rotation practices would  fall in the coming season͘ “In the case of maize, the profitability will fall 50%. Soybeans are  back as the first option of the business, even though it will still have more than estimated,”  explained Sebastián Salvaro, an analyst at AZ Group, in an interview with newspaper La  Nación.  The president of the Confederation of Rural Associations of Argentina, Dardo Chiesa, qualified the government measures as “treason͘”  “One person that betrays you one time can do it many times,” said Chiesa͘

 

Reports

 

Agriculture in the WTO: Rules and limits on US domestic support

 

Food Outlook is a biannual publication (May/June and November/December) focusing on  developments affecting global food and feed markets. The sub-title "Global Market Analysis" reflects this focus on developments in international markets, with comprehensive  assessments and forecasts on a commodity by commodity basis.  

 

The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets. Agricultural trade, climate change and food  security - FAO

 

This edition of The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets focuses on the complex and  underexplored intersection between agricultural trade, climate change and food security. The report makes an important contribution to the policy debates on climate change  adaptation and mitigation under the Paris Agreement and the multilateral agricultural trade rules. The report discusses policies - both domestic support and trade measures - that can promote food security, adaptation and mitigation, and improve the livelihoods of family  farmers around the world. Given both the slow- and rapid-onset impacts of climate change, policies that can significantly promote climate change adaptation and mitigation would benefit from deeper discussions in international fora on how to strengthen the mutually  supportive role of trade rules and climate interventions.  

 

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World. Building climate resilience for food   security and nutrition - FAO

 

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World is an annual flagship report jointly  prepared by FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WFP and WHO to inform on progress towards ending  hunger, achieving food security and improving nutrition and to provide in-depth analysis on key challenges for achieving this goal in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The report targets a wide audience, including policy-makers, international organizations, academic institutions and the general public.

 

Crops prospects and Food Situation - FAO

 

Crop Prospects and Food Situation is issued by the Trade and Markets Division of FAO, under the Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS). It is published four times a year and provides a forward-looking analysis of the food situation by geographic region, focusing on the cereal production outlook, market situation and food security conditions, with a  particular attention on Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries (LIFDCs).

 

 

Monthly Information Sources

AMIS Market Monitor

FAO Cereal Supply and Demand Brief - FAO

Grain Market Report - IGC

Oilcrops Monthly Price and Policy Update - FAO

Crop Monitoring in Europe - European Commission

FAO Rice Price Update - FAO

World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates - USDA

Early Warning Crop Monitor - GEOGLAM

Commodity Price Data - World Bank

Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) - FAO

GIEWS Country Briefs - FAO

 

The main purpose of the MNR is to provide links between the FAO Secretariat and the Members of the

Intergovernmental Group (IGG) on Grains, as well as the general public.

 

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

www.fao.org/economic/est

 

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Thursday, October 11, 2018
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